Skip to main content

I stand because I have hope

There has been so much talk and division about whether or not to stand for our national anthem.  I've had a lot of time to think about it and decided to finally weigh in with my opinion.

As a child I learned to stand and put my right hand over my heart for the playing of the national anthem.  I didn't ever really learn why.  But, as I've grown, matured, and become a part of the armed services as a military spouse, I've heard the playing of the national anthem more times than most people - and I've learned why I stand for the anthem.

Every weekday afternoon, living on an Air Force base, I hear the playing of the Star Spangled Banner over the base's loud speaker.  If I am driving my car, I pull over and wait.  If I am outside watching my children play, we all stop, turn towards where we know the flag is flying, place our hand over our heart, and listen - not moving.  We don't do this because it's required, but because of the respect that we have for our country and for the members of our armed services who have served, are serving and will serve our country to keep the freedoms which we value so deeply.

But, just to honor our armed forces, isn't the full reason that I stand for our anthem.  We are not a perfect country.  We have a lot of problems.  Children go hungry.  Homelessness is everywhere.  There is violence in every sized city and town.  There are so many forms of hatred being expressed throughout our country - whether it be against race, religion, country of origin, gender identity, sexual preferences, profession, wealth (or lack thereof), physical attributes, disabilities, and so much more.  In the past month, I've read too many stories of shootings, stabbings, bombings, bullying, assault, rape, trafficking, and so many other atrocities that make me sad and angry.  But, I don't sit down because I want changes to be made.  No.  I stand because I have hope that there are other good people out there who are working towards making a difference. 

Just this past week, I heard an amazing statement: Hope comes from a place of discontentment.  Think about it.  I want to be a part of the hope I have for a better nation.  I don't want to sit down to make a statement.  I want to stand to be a part of the action. 

I stand for the national anthem because I have hope in my country and the people living here who want to make it a better place to live.  We've come so far from where we started, but we still have a long way to go, and I will continue to take part in the change.  I will continue to teach my kids that this country isn't perfect, but we need people to have hope that we can continue to press on and make improvements.

I  stand because I have hope.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Why can't they just be friends?

Why can't my kids just be friends?  I must ask myself this question hundreds of times during the week. 

I thought that having kids relatively close together was going to be great.  They'd have a playmate and an automatic friend.  However, the truth is that - most of the time - they don't get along.  It's not that they're enemies...it's that they drive each other crazy. 

They each want the other one to do what they want to do.  Then, when the other one does what they want, they get mad at them because they wanted to do it themselves.

They don't want to share their toys.  Then, they play together only to then get mad and purposefully break the other sibling's toys.

They want to get the other one in trouble so that they look like the "good" child and get more rewards.  Then they get upset that the other sibling got them in trouble when they *tattled* on them.

At mealtimes, they want to sit where the other one is sitting.  They want the cup the ot…

Portland's Rose Summit

I have a great passion for working with women to become stronger leaders who are making differences in their communities.  It is with this in mind that I share with you an amazing opportunity for Portland women: the Junior League of Portland's inaugural Women's Empowerment & Leadership Summit.

This leadership summit will be held on May 11, 2018 at the Hilton Downtown Portland and is a day-long leadership and professional development conference open to all women in the Portland and surrounding communities.

The theme is Diversity and Inclusion and the Junior League is honored to feature Tarana Burke, activist and founder of the #MeToo Movement.  The Summit will offer opportunities for workshops, speakers, networking, and camaraderie among women in all stages of leadership around our community.

The Summit is a major fundraiser for the Junior League of Portland and all proceeds from the event support the League's community fund, the 1910 Campaign, with 100% of the money ra…
Here's a Friday First for me, a video!  Let me know what you think about it and if you'd like to see more.  Also, share what your plans are for the weekend to help others figure out what they're going to do.