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A Mother's Job

With Mother's Day quickly approaching...hint, hint to all the father's and children reading this blog post...I thought I'd do a quick recap of what I've learned over the past year about a mother's job. 

A mother's job, while quieted within society, is rarely filled with quiet.
It's filled with spills, spit ups, pukes, poops, dirty laundry, and dirty diapers because it's not a clean job. 
Because of this, we fill the diaper bag with a change of clothes for both Baby and Mama
Our days are not filled with sleep.  Sleep is overrated; naps are essential.
As is coffee...more than one cup.  The coffee shop knows to keep that cup full.

Happiness for a mother is that first night you get four hours of sleep.
It's the first smile and laugh - even if it is because of gas.
It's finding time to take a shower and fix your hair.
It's making it through a day with no blow outs.
It's eating a hot meal.
It's finding your belly button and taking those first steps.
It's hugs with tiny pats on the back.

"Ma Ma" is rarely the first word because Baby knows you'll always be there.
Mothers understand the difference between "da da" and "dah dah" - one is Dad, the other the dog - although sometimes it's also a duck.
Mothers also understand sign language.  We know when the "point and grunt" means Baby's hungry and when it means Baby wants picked up.

Mothers are psychics.
We know where Baby is when there is no noise at all.
Mothers are doctors.
We kiss away the bumps and bruises and can tell the difference between a cold and teething.
Mothers are entertainers.
Reading books, singing songs, eating plastic food...all day long.
Mothers are teachers.
Knowing right from wrong; noses from toes, numbers, colors, and more.

Mothers are rarely recognized.
They're rarely acknowledged.
They're rarely appreciated.
Why?  Because, even without these things, we're still always here.

Mothers are different.
Unique.
There are no two mothers alike.
And, that's ok. 
There's no one way to be a mother.
There's no one way to succeed.

Being a mother is not for everyone.
The physical act of having a child does not make everyone a mother.
It is the emotional involvement, the mental toll, the everyday insanity that every mother goes through and learns to survive.
Mothers are amazing creatures, created by God, given amazing abilities to overcome obstacles, trials, and stresses.

This is a mother's job.

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