Skip to main content

A Mother's Job

With Mother's Day quickly approaching...hint, hint to all the father's and children reading this blog post...I thought I'd do a quick recap of what I've learned over the past year about a mother's job. 

A mother's job, while quieted within society, is rarely filled with quiet.
It's filled with spills, spit ups, pukes, poops, dirty laundry, and dirty diapers because it's not a clean job. 
Because of this, we fill the diaper bag with a change of clothes for both Baby and Mama
Our days are not filled with sleep.  Sleep is overrated; naps are essential.
As is coffee...more than one cup.  The coffee shop knows to keep that cup full.

Happiness for a mother is that first night you get four hours of sleep.
It's the first smile and laugh - even if it is because of gas.
It's finding time to take a shower and fix your hair.
It's making it through a day with no blow outs.
It's eating a hot meal.
It's finding your belly button and taking those first steps.
It's hugs with tiny pats on the back.

"Ma Ma" is rarely the first word because Baby knows you'll always be there.
Mothers understand the difference between "da da" and "dah dah" - one is Dad, the other the dog - although sometimes it's also a duck.
Mothers also understand sign language.  We know when the "point and grunt" means Baby's hungry and when it means Baby wants picked up.

Mothers are psychics.
We know where Baby is when there is no noise at all.
Mothers are doctors.
We kiss away the bumps and bruises and can tell the difference between a cold and teething.
Mothers are entertainers.
Reading books, singing songs, eating plastic food...all day long.
Mothers are teachers.
Knowing right from wrong; noses from toes, numbers, colors, and more.

Mothers are rarely recognized.
They're rarely acknowledged.
They're rarely appreciated.
Why?  Because, even without these things, we're still always here.

Mothers are different.
Unique.
There are no two mothers alike.
And, that's ok. 
There's no one way to be a mother.
There's no one way to succeed.

Being a mother is not for everyone.
The physical act of having a child does not make everyone a mother.
It is the emotional involvement, the mental toll, the everyday insanity that every mother goes through and learns to survive.
Mothers are amazing creatures, created by God, given amazing abilities to overcome obstacles, trials, and stresses.

This is a mother's job.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

If you give a mom a coffee cup

If you give a mom a coffee cup, she'll say "thank you" and immediately go to the coffee pot. 

At the coffee pot, she'll start the coffee and pour herself a cup...noticing the full cup of cold coffee that she poured herself yesterday.

She'll take the cold cup of coffee to the sink, dump it down the drain, and go to put it in the dishwasher.

She'll open the dishwasher and realize that it's full of clean dishes that need to be put away.

She'll put away all of the clean dishes and then will put in the dirty - now empty - cup of coffee from yesterday.

She'll notice that there are other dirty dishes in the sink that need to go into the dishwasher, so she'll put them all in the dishwasher.

She'll then realize that there may be other dirty dishes other places in the house and will go looking for them...finding them in bathrooms, on the coffee table, under beds, and in the sandbox outside.

While looking for dirty dishes, she'll notice that ther…

Portland's Rose Summit

I have a great passion for working with women to become stronger leaders who are making differences in their communities.  It is with this in mind that I share with you an amazing opportunity for Portland women: the Junior League of Portland's inaugural Women's Empowerment & Leadership Summit.

This leadership summit will be held on May 11, 2018 at the Hilton Downtown Portland and is a day-long leadership and professional development conference open to all women in the Portland and surrounding communities.

The theme is Diversity and Inclusion and the Junior League is honored to feature Tarana Burke, activist and founder of the #MeToo Movement.  The Summit will offer opportunities for workshops, speakers, networking, and camaraderie among women in all stages of leadership around our community.

The Summit is a major fundraiser for the Junior League of Portland and all proceeds from the event support the League's community fund, the 1910 Campaign, with 100% of the money ra…

Don't forget the military child

I have a fierce passion for the military and military families, but there is one aspect of both of these groups that is often forgotten: the military child.

In case you didn't know it, April is the month of the military child.  There are currently about 1.7 million children connected to the military, 75% of whom are school-aged.  Over 80% of these students attend U.S. public schools...so your local schools most likely have a child impacted by military service.

As adults - especially if we are associated with the military - we can have an understanding for military life.  We may not always like it, but we understand the concepts of transition, hurry up and wait, and separations.  These concepts aren't so easily understandable - or explainable - to our children.

The average military child will move every three years (that's 6-9 times during their K-12 years).  They also face numerous separations from one or both of their parents.  These can cause turmoil that need to be add…