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How Many Laws Does Murphy Have?

My morning started off fairly normal.  I was woken up 30 minutes before my alarm went off by a newly potty-trained child telling me her bed was wet.   As I was changing the sheets, the same child had helped herself to a breakfast of Oreos.  My baby boy decided to then wake up as I was cleaning up the trail of double-stuffed cookie crumbs.  Always a happy child, he immediately smiled and brought me back to my happy mama zone.  So, with one child's hunger temporarily satisfied, I opted to take a gamble on getting a shower before noon. 

My children were happily playing in my bedroom with PBS Kids playing in the background.  I got everything ready for my shower and started brushing my teeth.  Halfway through my first task, my toddler daughter  told me that my still-infant son was "a piggy bank."  Unsure of what she was talking about, I glanced at my son and noticed that he had something in his mouth.  Well-versed in Heimlich procedures, I quickly scooped out his mouth only to find several varieties of coins with which my daughter had "gently" put in his mouth.  Unsure if this was all of the coins, a call was placed and a doctor's appointment - including x-ray - were quickly scheduled.

Murphy's Laws are a phenomenon that most people know and have run into at several points in their life.  For mothers, the question isn't necessarily whether or not you're going to run into one of Murphy's Laws.  No, the question is, how many laws does Murphy actually have?  Thankfully, my story ended semi-positively with no swallowed coins, no shower until after noon for Mama, and as stern of a lecture as you can give to a 3-year-old about the importance of not putting small items in her brother's mouth, as well as the danger of climbing bookshelves to retrieve said coins.  An important Mama's Law (a.k.a., Murphy's Laws for Moms) was also learned: If you attempt to do something for yourself, no matter how small, a child will interrupt it.


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