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Amazing meal my kids actually ate

I'm continually searching for whole meals that my kids will eat that are not Happy Meals. This is no easy task as it needs to be something that is fairly simple so that I can easily prepare without my kids destroying the house. It needs to look normal or another battle will be waged at the dinner table.  It needs to be inexpensive because, let's face it, my kids most likely won't eat it.  And, it needs to be something that I actually want to eat, too.

I can usually find one or two food items that my kids will eat, but a whole meal...hardly ever.  Then, as I was strolling through my Pinterest feed while waiting for Child #2 to either decide he did or did not have something to extricate from his belly.  I came across a masterpiece!

Mostly Homemade Mom: Loaded Mashed Potato Casserole - Country Crock Sta..

This dish is amazing.  Not only was it something that I felt could be served in a restaurant of the not drive-thru kind, but  it was real food. I loved it.  My husband loved it.  My kids loved it.  The only question on my mind after making it was, "How am I going to get my kids to eat the leftovers?"  They won't eat the same thing two nights in a row, so I had to get a bit creative.

The next night, I had both children come into the kitchen to "help" me make dinner.  I got out the leftover casserole dish and we used ice cream scoops to dish out several balls of potatoes.  Then, we dunked these balls in flour and squashed them with our hands.  My five-year-old was very meticulous about getting each of her balls perfectly flat.  My two-year-old just enjoyed squashing them.  We then put each flattened pancake ball into a skillet heated with olive oil and made our own potato cakes. The kids were amazed at the transformation from potatoes to cakes and then excited to eat the leftover, re-designed dish.

This is definitely a dish that I will be making again.  Thank you, Mostly Homemade Mom, for sharing this recipe!

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