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Yes, I'm a mean mom

Do the words coming out of your children's mouths ever bother you? They used to bother me. I don't like being told I'm mean or that my child wants a new mommy. It's not fun to be screamed or growled at. I especially don't like when my children say they hate me.

But, they are growing and learning boundaries. So, if I have to be the mean mom because I draw the line at throwing temper tantrums in the store because I said we couldn't buy that toy or candy bar because I believe my kids need to not only understand they can't have everything, but also the value of a dollar and patience in waiting for good things, then I'm ok with being the mean mom. I'm also ok with being hated because my child got put in time out or had toys taken away when they were putting themselves or others at risk of injury by not following safety rules or getting in a fight with someone else.

If being a mean mom is what it takes so my child understands and recognizes boundaries, then I'm happy to be a mean mom because at the end of the day I know I love my my children who are learning and growing.

Oh, and I'm also happy to be the mom who doesn't earn any stickers throughout the day because I didn't give into my child's desire to buy ten kitties...

Comments

  1. HA! I am a mean mom too! My kids think I'm the worst mom in the world!
    Hi! Stopping by from Mom Bloggers Club. Great blog!
    Have a nice day!

    ReplyDelete

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