Skip to main content

Are we living too globally?

Over the past several months, I've been doing a lot of thinking.  In light of recent tragedies both in the U.S. and abroad - whether domestic issues or terrorist activities - I've begun to take a look at myself and what I can do to make a difference.  I want to make a difference so that my children do not grow up seeing violence and hate everywhere they go.  I want my children to understand that they can make a difference in the grander scheme of life.  But, how do I teach them to do this?

One question that keeps coming to mind is whether or not we are living in a world that thinks too globally instead of locally.  Technology and social media have allowed us to view atrocious acts of violence and deprivation throughout the world.  Acts which need people to step in to stop and change for the better.  We need people and organizations who are willing to act globally.  However, as I look at the community around me, this same technology and social media has caused a great divide in our local communities and neighborhoods.  Kids and teenagers don't play outside as much.  Neighbors don't talk to one another - sometimes they don't even know one another.  We have stopped supporting the people directly beside us and; therefore, allowed division to take place and we have become blinded to when tragedies are forming or happening in our own neighborhoods...until they make the news and start trending on our social media accounts.

Living locally does not mean that we stop looking at the global issues surrounding us.  In fact, it can mean quite the opposite.  Welcoming all neighbors - including refugees - to our communities and helping them establish their homes is the first step we can do to live locally.  Learning about our neighbors by talking to them - or at least saying hi - is the second step.  Not only will this teach our children the true definition of "being social" but it will also teach them about hospitality, friendship, diversity, and so much more.

Over the past several years, I have established a semi-relationship with a woman who walks past my house every single day.  She came to the U.S. as a refugee and continues to praise the U.S. for all that it has provided for her and her family.  Her grandchildren are growing and learning in an environment free from daily acts of violence and fear.  I have learned more about global and historical issues from her than any other person I know.  ...and it started out by simply saying "hi" as she was passing my house.  This turned into, "How are you?" Which has grown into a better understanding of the people living around me.  The funny thing is, all of this has happened throughout the course conversations that have been less than five minutes in length and only when we happen to be outside at the same time.

Do we care too much about what happens on the other side of the world instead of in our own backyards?  While my answer to this question still sways back and forth, I think there is a lot of benefit to making better attempts at living locally.  After all, as a parent, it takes a village to raise a child - and while I can rely on lots of advice and opinions online, it's my neighbors who I go to when I truly need help.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

If you give a mom a coffee cup

If you give a mom a coffee cup, she'll say "thank you" and immediately go to the coffee pot. 

At the coffee pot, she'll start the coffee and pour herself a cup...noticing the full cup of cold coffee that she poured herself yesterday.

She'll take the cold cup of coffee to the sink, dump it down the drain, and go to put it in the dishwasher.

She'll open the dishwasher and realize that it's full of clean dishes that need to be put away.

She'll put away all of the clean dishes and then will put in the dirty - now empty - cup of coffee from yesterday.

She'll notice that there are other dirty dishes in the sink that need to go into the dishwasher, so she'll put them all in the dishwasher.

She'll then realize that there may be other dirty dishes other places in the house and will go looking for them...finding them in bathrooms, on the coffee table, under beds, and in the sandbox outside.

While looking for dirty dishes, she'll notice that ther…

Bummis Super Brite

It's been seven long years since I started this blog as a place to look for cloth diaper reviews.  In that time, my family has grown to a party of five.  For a variety of reasons, we didn't do a lot of cloth diapering with our middle child, but now #3 is here and the cloth diapers have come back out!  With so many new options for cloth diapering, I thought I'd take a look back at my original reviews and update as needed.

So, let's start with the Bummis Super Brite!  I am still a big fan of this diaper cover.  Not only does it provide excellent coverage to minimize blowouts and leaks, but it is also easy to use and stylish in it's super brite colors and new designs in Cactus, Tampa and Circus.

However, there is one point to note.  My baby #3 is not a tiny baby as my previous two children were.  He likes to eat and his size shows it.  So, as we've re-begun using cloth diapers, I've noticed that they don't all fit like they did on his siblings.  The Bummis…

I stand because I have hope

There has been so much talk and division about whether or not to stand for our national anthem.  I've had a lot of time to think about it and decided to finally weigh in with my opinion.

As a child I learned to stand and put my right hand over my heart for the playing of the national anthem.  I didn't ever really learn why.  But, as I've grown, matured, and become a part of the armed services as a military spouse, I've heard the playing of the national anthem more times than most people - and I've learned why I stand for the anthem.

Every weekday afternoon, living on an Air Force base, I hear the playing of the Star Spangled Banner over the base's loud speaker.  If I am driving my car, I pull over and wait.  If I am outside watching my children play, we all stop, turn towards where we know the flag is flying, place our hand over our heart, and listen - not moving.  We don't do this because it's required, but because of the respect that we have for our c…