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If you give a mom a coffee cup

If you give a mom a coffee cup, she'll say "thank you" and immediately go to the coffee pot. 

At the coffee pot, she'll start the coffee and pour herself a cup...noticing the full cup of cold coffee that she poured herself yesterday.

She'll take the cold cup of coffee to the sink, dump it down the drain, and go to put it in the dishwasher.

She'll open the dishwasher and realize that it's full of clean dishes that need to be put away.

She'll put away all of the clean dishes and then will put in the dirty - now empty - cup of coffee from yesterday.

She'll notice that there are other dirty dishes in the sink that need to go into the dishwasher, so she'll put them all in the dishwasher.

She'll then realize that there may be other dirty dishes other places in the house and will go looking for them...finding them in bathrooms, on the coffee table, under beds, and in the sandbox outside.

While looking for dirty dishes, she'll notice that there's a lot of dirty laundry lying around the house, so she'll come back for these after putting all the dirty dishes into the dishwasher.

She'll collect the dirty laundry, sort it, and start a load...noticing that there's a load in the dryer that no one bothered to empty, fold, and put away.

So, she'll empty the dryer, fold the laundry, sort it by family member, and then scream for them to come put it away - while taking her laundry to her room and putting it away.

She'll come back out to the folded stacks of laundry for others to put away and realize that no one heard her...so she'll go find them to tell them.

When she goes to find them, she'll notice that they're building a tent fort with every single clean blanket, sheet, and towel in the house. 

Instead of getting mad at them dirtying the clean tent-making materials, she'll get down on her hands and knees and join in the tent-making fun...realizing that these moments will soon be gone.

But, then, one of the tent makers will tell her that they're hungry, and she'll realize that it's almost lunch time.

She'll go back to the kitchen and figure out what she can make for lunch...wishing for something grand, but settling for sandwiches.

She'll yell to the tent makers that their lunches are ready and, after hearing the stampede begin, will remind them not to run in the house.

She'll then hear the washing machine end and will go to move the load to the dryer and start another load - which reminds her that the tent makers still haven't put away their clean, folded laundry.

She'll remind the tent makers to put away their laundry after they finish their lunches, and then proceeds to make her own lunch.

While eating lunch, the doorbell will ring and she'll answer it to find the neighbor kids wanting the tent makers to come out to play.

She'll remind the tent makers that they cannot play until their laundry is put away - to which they'll moan and groan, but will eventually take the clothes to their rooms.

Once the tent makers are outside playing, she'll realize that they forgot to clean up their lunch plates, so she'll pick them up and put them into the dishwasher.

...where she'll see yesterday's dirty, empty cup of coffee that reminds her that today's full cup is still sitting next to the coffee pot. Now cold.

Moral of the story: Always bring Mom a FULL cup of HOT coffee.

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