Skip to main content

If you give a mom a coffee cup

If you give a mom a coffee cup, she'll say "thank you" and immediately go to the coffee pot. 

At the coffee pot, she'll start the coffee and pour herself a cup...noticing the full cup of cold coffee that she poured herself yesterday.

She'll take the cold cup of coffee to the sink, dump it down the drain, and go to put it in the dishwasher.

She'll open the dishwasher and realize that it's full of clean dishes that need to be put away.

She'll put away all of the clean dishes and then will put in the dirty - now empty - cup of coffee from yesterday.

She'll notice that there are other dirty dishes in the sink that need to go into the dishwasher, so she'll put them all in the dishwasher.

She'll then realize that there may be other dirty dishes other places in the house and will go looking for them...finding them in bathrooms, on the coffee table, under beds, and in the sandbox outside.

While looking for dirty dishes, she'll notice that there's a lot of dirty laundry lying around the house, so she'll come back for these after putting all the dirty dishes into the dishwasher.

She'll collect the dirty laundry, sort it, and start a load...noticing that there's a load in the dryer that no one bothered to empty, fold, and put away.

So, she'll empty the dryer, fold the laundry, sort it by family member, and then scream for them to come put it away - while taking her laundry to her room and putting it away.

She'll come back out to the folded stacks of laundry for others to put away and realize that no one heard her...so she'll go find them to tell them.

When she goes to find them, she'll notice that they're building a tent fort with every single clean blanket, sheet, and towel in the house. 

Instead of getting mad at them dirtying the clean tent-making materials, she'll get down on her hands and knees and join in the tent-making fun...realizing that these moments will soon be gone.

But, then, one of the tent makers will tell her that they're hungry, and she'll realize that it's almost lunch time.

She'll go back to the kitchen and figure out what she can make for lunch...wishing for something grand, but settling for sandwiches.

She'll yell to the tent makers that their lunches are ready and, after hearing the stampede begin, will remind them not to run in the house.

She'll then hear the washing machine end and will go to move the load to the dryer and start another load - which reminds her that the tent makers still haven't put away their clean, folded laundry.

She'll remind the tent makers to put away their laundry after they finish their lunches, and then proceeds to make her own lunch.

While eating lunch, the doorbell will ring and she'll answer it to find the neighbor kids wanting the tent makers to come out to play.

She'll remind the tent makers that they cannot play until their laundry is put away - to which they'll moan and groan, but will eventually take the clothes to their rooms.

Once the tent makers are outside playing, she'll realize that they forgot to clean up their lunch plates, so she'll pick them up and put them into the dishwasher.

...where she'll see yesterday's dirty, empty cup of coffee that reminds her that today's full cup is still sitting next to the coffee pot. Now cold.

Moral of the story: Always bring Mom a FULL cup of HOT coffee.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Here's a Friday First for me, a video!  Let me know what you think about it and if you'd like to see more.  Also, share what your plans are for the weekend to help others figure out what they're going to do.

Leadership Mom: SWOT Analysis

In business, leaders often analyze our Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats through a SWOT analysis.  So, if we are going to look at our role as moms as being the greatest leadership opportunity to us, let's start with analyzing ourselves and our kids.  Here's the SWOT I developed for my family:

As a doting mother, there are hundreds of strengths that I could put up here for my kids.  Their hugs, kisses, bedtime stories and prayers, the fact that they come to me when they're seeking healing from an injury (physical or emotional), the notes and drawings they make for me, their precious hearts when they try to help me or that they've learned how to use the Keurig to bring me coffee in the morning...I could go on and on.

Now, here's the part where we get honest with ourselves.  Yes, we love our kids and we love our family (or, hopefully, most of the time), but we are not perfect.  Nor should we be perfect.  As we analyze ourselves and our families, we hav…

Thoughts from a non-traditional student

It's the end of the school year for many of us.  My kids are thrilled about this and keep telling me that they're so excited to have the summer off...they don't yet realize that we'll have a new family chore chart and lessons on being a "contributor" to the family!

For me, the end of the school year is also exciting.  It is also the end of my first year back to school for a new degree in Cyber Operations, a degree that is almost the complete opposite of my other degree in Communication and Advertising.  It also was exciting to realize that you really can start learning something new at any age, no matter how long it's been since your last time in school.  With this in mind, I thought I'd do a recap of some thoughts I had during my nontraditional year.
Going back to school is scary.  There's new technology. Not every teacher uses a textbook. You're *often* older than the teachers. There's no easy way to balance school-work-family life. You&#…