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Baby Manuals

When my husband and I first found out that we were expecting, we were excited.  We had desired a family for a while and thought that we were as ready as we could be; however, we quickly learned that we had a lot to learn about raising a child.  We began researching libraries, the Internet, and questioning friends and families about raising a child and determined that a. there is no manual for children and b. every thing you read or every person you talk to will tell you different information - information which is often times extremely divergent.

From pregnancy to labor and delivery, whether or not to use cloth diapers, setting up sleep schedules, breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding, and so on and so on, the advice is too numerous to count.  As I have read about all of the numerous ways you can grow your baby, I have - at times - become completely overwhelmed with the possibility of messing up my child.  Thankfully, I have come across some wise mothers who have reminded me that there are no two children alike (even identical twins - of which I can fully attest since I am one); therefore, no two children will develop at the same rate, use the same tools/tricks of the motherhood trade, or even act the same to the same stimulation. 

So, with this in mind, my goal in this blog is to have a place to share the information that has worked for my baby and me.  It may or may not work with you and your baby, but you can read what I have to say, take it with a grain of salt, or just leave it and decide for yourself what's best for you.  As I continue to learn, that's the joy of raising children...it's easier to make it up as you go along so that you can enjoy every new adventure and encounter!

Please feel free to comment and/or pass on this information to other people.  If my experiences can help out just one other person, then I will view this as success!

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