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Diapers: It's What's Inside that Counts

After researching all about cloth diapering, I learned a lot about the different covers, ways to fasten, cleaning, and everything else associated with the diaper except the actual diaper.  What goes under the diaper cover is by far the MOST important aspect of cloth diapering.  After all, it's what (hopefully) holds everything in.  I was amazed when my eyes were opened to the worlds of diapering differences.

When people think of cloth diapering, many people look at what's available in the stores and then assume that Gerber is the primary brand for the prefolds and flatfolds.  And, while it may be true that Gerber is the leader in positioning amongst many store shelves, in my opinion, they are not the leader in quality and cloth diapering efficiency.  This is where Cloth-eez comes in.

Let's start by taking a closer look at the Gerber diapers.  Just for this blog, we'll focus on the prefolds.  There are several different types of Gerber prefolds (differing in thickness).  This is a good thing as the child grows larger, consumes more, and thus has more output (a.k.a., poop and pee).  The cost of Gerber prefolds is also quite a bit lower than the cost for other brands.  However, as the Gerbers are used more and more, you may notice that the texture of the diapers changes from a soft, cushioned texture to one that is scratchy and inconsistent.  The Gerbers also are not as size-appropriate for our babies as most other brands, thus leading to bulky diapers that are difficult to pin or Snappi.  This can lead to difficulty for your child as he/she tries to roll over and use his/her legs.

The Cloth-eez brand prefolds that I use are color-coded by size, so they also grow with my child, but in a way that is better fitting to her size - not just her output.  The material used in the diapers also gets softer and more absorbent the more that it is washed (directions say to wash multiple times prior to use in order to begin to build the absorbency).  While the Cloth-eez are more expensive (ranging from $21 - $36 per dozen depending on the size), my daughter and I have both been much happier with the "results" of fewer leaks, mobility, and overall quality of this brand.

Cloth-eez sells their diapers in either chlorine-free white, unbleached, or organic cotton. They are 4-8-4Ply, making them more absorbent than Gerbers which use a standard 3, 4, or 6-Ply.  The sizes are based on the age and weight of the child, thus making them more "custom" fitting than other brands.


Another thing that I love about Cloth-eez is that they also have the Workhorse diapers available.  These are prefold diapers that are shaped like a fitted diaper.  These diapers are more expensive, but I've loved my tests with them!

For more information on Cloth-eez, be sure to check out www.greenmountaindiapers.com.  And, if you have a brand of diapers that you love, be sure to leave a comment.  I'm always up for testing out other brands!!

Comments

  1. We LOVE our Gro Baby diapers but I didn't use them when the girls were newborns because they were just too small to wear cloth (4lbs). This is the only brand I use as I am not a diaper collector, more of a get the job done kinda girl.

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