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Out and About

When my husband and I first started using cloth diapers, we decided that we were only going to use them around the house.  It sounded way too difficult to travel with cloth diapers and, after all, that would still save us a lot of money.  Eight months later...I love cloth diapers so much that I almost exclusively use them.  The only time we don't use them is at night.  So, during the week I only use seven - maybe eight - sposies...that's approximately $2 per week spent on sposies (or 23 weeks to use one package of diapers...you'll change sizes before you run out!).

There are many misconceptions to using cloth diapers while out and about (for your day-to-day errands - we'll discuss long-term travel in a future blog).  Some people think that it's too much of a mess (or smell).  Others think that it's too difficult to change CDs on the run.  Even more think it's easier to use sposies.  Well, let's take a look at these situations:

1. MYTH: It's too much of a mess (or smell)
    FACT: Depending on the type of wet bag you buy (I'll have some reviews in the near future), there is little to no smell while traveling with dirty/wet diapers.  You don't want to use just any bag (plastic store bags will most certainly tinge your diaper bag with one of the most unpleasant aromas I've ever experienced).  You want to use a bag that is specifically made for cloth diapering.  These often have antibacterial properties to completely absorb both the scent and sense of all that's associated with diapers.

2.  MYTH: It's too difficult to change CDs on the run
     FACT: It's difficult to change any diaper on the run.  So, there's really no difference in whether or not it's a cloth diaper or sposie.  Using the method that you are most comfortable with is important because you will have limited space (whether it's a bathroom stall, the backseat of the car, or grassy area).  If you don't think you'll be comfortable changing a prefold and cover while out and about, buy a few AIOs or pocket diapers.  They'll take up a bit more room in your diaper bag, but can help you feel at ease while still saving money and the environment.

3.  MYTH: Sposies are easier
     FACT: Many places (at least in my city) are now putting signs up saying not to dispose of any diaper in their waste containers due to health concerns.  Therefore, you may still need to carry around a dirty diaper until you find a place where you can properly dispose of it.  If you're going to have to carry around the diaper anyways, why not make it a cloth?  Plus, with the ease of AIOs and pockets, the only thing different is the material the diaper is made of.  The application process is exactly the same.

Traveling or running errands does not mean the end of your cloth diapering experience.  However, there is preparation needed.  If you are going to spend a day traveling around town, you will need to think ahead so that you remember all of your cloth diapering needs (prefolds, an extra cover, Snappi, wet bag, and cloth wipes and diaper spray - if using).  But, there's truly no more preparation than if you were preparing for a day out with sposies.  It's a simple matter of recognizing what you typically use during a diaper change and assuring that you have it with you.

So, next time you need to run a few errands, why not try to take those cloth diapers with you...save that money and the environment.

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Here's a Friday First for me, a video!  Let me know what you think about it and if you'd like to see more.  Also, share what your plans are for the weekend to help others figure out what they're going to do.