Skip to main content

Indoor rain


Since moving to the Pacific Northwest many years ago, I've become somewhat accustomed to the rain.  I still don't like it, but I'm now prepared for it with my designer rain boots and rain coat and lack of umbrella so I don't look like a tourist.  The one thing I'm unsure I'll ever become accustomed to is the fact that my children love the rain.  And, when I say love, I mean that they would prefer for days to be rainy so that they can go outside and splash in the puddles or run around and get wet.  So, what does a rain-loving child do when weeks go by with no rain?  Well, they make it themselves. 


A rain-loving child wakes  up sometime before 4:30 am, escapes from his baby-proofed and booby trapped room. He goes downstairs without waking anyone.  He then finds both stoppers for the double kitchen sink, turns on the faucet and – as Elsa would sing – LETS IT GO! And, boy, does it go! It fills the sink until it sloshes over the edge cascading down the cabinets on the floor - the hardwood floors which you've desperately tried to keep looking nice despite the tremendous amount of toys able to inflict deep scratches in the surface.  The water continues to flow into a torrential downpour quickly covering the entire surface of your kitchen and into the carpet in surrounding rooms.

The mother - who thought she was restfully sleeping wakes up to a strange sound at 4:47 am, quickly runs downstairs to check out the rain forest sounds only to be greeted by a small little being, dressed in only PJs and rain boots, proudly announcing, "Look, Mommy! We can splash!!!"

What does a speechless mother do to a child who is grinning from ear to ear over the fact that they have just successfully developed an indoor splash park? Do you discipline them?  Would they understand why they’re being disciplined? If you do nothing, will you wake up another morning to another indoor rainstorm?  If you do discipline them, what is the appropriate strategy?

In my case, my son had to help me clean up his mess. We used every single towel in our house and then borrowed some from our neighbor. He helped Shop Vac the water up (once I remembered that a Shop Vac could be used for liquid messes). We talked about playing with water and where and when it’s appropriate (i.e., not in the kitchen sink at 4:30 in the morning). 
 
Now, my only problem is that apparently it's just as much fun to make an indoor rain storm as it is to clean one up...thank goodness it once again decided to rain outside.  But, just in case, I may need to verify that my insurance policy covers flooding by toddler.

If only I'd been in the right state of mind to get a picture before clean up...Next time???

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

If you give a mom a coffee cup

If you give a mom a coffee cup, she'll say "thank you" and immediately go to the coffee pot. 

At the coffee pot, she'll start the coffee and pour herself a cup...noticing the full cup of cold coffee that she poured herself yesterday.

She'll take the cold cup of coffee to the sink, dump it down the drain, and go to put it in the dishwasher.

She'll open the dishwasher and realize that it's full of clean dishes that need to be put away.

She'll put away all of the clean dishes and then will put in the dirty - now empty - cup of coffee from yesterday.

She'll notice that there are other dirty dishes in the sink that need to go into the dishwasher, so she'll put them all in the dishwasher.

She'll then realize that there may be other dirty dishes other places in the house and will go looking for them...finding them in bathrooms, on the coffee table, under beds, and in the sandbox outside.

While looking for dirty dishes, she'll notice that ther…

Portland's Rose Summit

I have a great passion for working with women to become stronger leaders who are making differences in their communities.  It is with this in mind that I share with you an amazing opportunity for Portland women: the Junior League of Portland's inaugural Women's Empowerment & Leadership Summit.

This leadership summit will be held on May 11, 2018 at the Hilton Downtown Portland and is a day-long leadership and professional development conference open to all women in the Portland and surrounding communities.

The theme is Diversity and Inclusion and the Junior League is honored to feature Tarana Burke, activist and founder of the #MeToo Movement.  The Summit will offer opportunities for workshops, speakers, networking, and camaraderie among women in all stages of leadership around our community.

The Summit is a major fundraiser for the Junior League of Portland and all proceeds from the event support the League's community fund, the 1910 Campaign, with 100% of the money ra…

Don't forget the military child

I have a fierce passion for the military and military families, but there is one aspect of both of these groups that is often forgotten: the military child.

In case you didn't know it, April is the month of the military child.  There are currently about 1.7 million children connected to the military, 75% of whom are school-aged.  Over 80% of these students attend U.S. public schools...so your local schools most likely have a child impacted by military service.

As adults - especially if we are associated with the military - we can have an understanding for military life.  We may not always like it, but we understand the concepts of transition, hurry up and wait, and separations.  These concepts aren't so easily understandable - or explainable - to our children.

The average military child will move every three years (that's 6-9 times during their K-12 years).  They also face numerous separations from one or both of their parents.  These can cause turmoil that need to be add…