Skip to main content

Diminishing returns

Today, I'm studying the indirect correlation between the productivity of parent and child.  This is an interesting study upon which to endeavor and, while I may never fully develop the study into a well-working model, I consider this to be my own example of diminishing returns. Let's take a look at this economic principle in the light of my own parental experience. 

While my husband at times remarks as to how wonderful it could be to expand on the number of people living within the confines of our home (and, granted, there are moments I, too, think this could be a cute idea), the number of children that we have is very certainly controlled constant.

This is our fixed input.

Now, before we go any further, I must take time to decipher what I believe to be the most adequate definition of the commodity that we're attempting to produce throughout our parenting experience.  On one hand, you might say that this commodity is a well-mannered, intelligent, understanding child.  However, this economic principle is not one of longevity.  So, I must throw out this claim that the commodity here is the development of my children.  No, in the short run, the true commodity of this study is my own parental productivity (a.k.a, sanity).  I've chosen this because, at the end of each day, I view my success as a parent on the fact that I have not completely lost my mind.  I call this productivity because the amount of sanity that I hold on to throughout each day is directly related to my levels of productivity as a parent in the long run.  Ah, but you recall that I stated this was not a study of longevity.  This is where I am theorizing that, as a parent, if I should complete each day in a sane manner, then my children - in the long run - will better develop into better adults and citizens.  Simplified...perhaps.

So now let's take a look at my study.

As previously stated, the number of children within my family is a fixed input.  It is not changing.  The inputs that change are the productivity levels of my children.  But, what is the productivity of a child?  While one could argue it's the amount they learn through the day, I would counter this argument with the fact that my children - as with many other children - seem to learn most productively through play.  I am able to manage certain levels of my children's productivity.  It is a healthy scenario for all of us.  However, as the levels of their productivity increase, so does the level of chaos and destruction.  Thus, there becomes a point when the sought after commodity - my sanity - begins to decrease.

This remains true unless I am able to change the techniques for production of my commodity.


Perhaps this is where one could argue that larger families get it right.  By increasing the number of children, their technique for production changes.  Older kids entertain younger kids.  This might then allow parents time to go to the bathroom by themselves, take a shower, or even make meals - thus increasing our parental sanity commodity.

But, I'm not so sure I'm willing to move into this stage of testing out all of my new found parental economic theories...


*Note: I am not an economist and may not have adequately demonstrated the law of diminishing returns.  This article is meant to be used as a humorous view on my life as a parent.  If I have inaccurately demonstrated this economic principle, I encourage you to add your own demonstration in my comments area.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Here's a Friday First for me, a video!  Let me know what you think about it and if you'd like to see more.  Also, share what your plans are for the weekend to help others figure out what they're going to do.

Leadership Mom: SWOT Analysis

In business, leaders often analyze our Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats through a SWOT analysis.  So, if we are going to look at our role as moms as being the greatest leadership opportunity to us, let's start with analyzing ourselves and our kids.  Here's the SWOT I developed for my family:

As a doting mother, there are hundreds of strengths that I could put up here for my kids.  Their hugs, kisses, bedtime stories and prayers, the fact that they come to me when they're seeking healing from an injury (physical or emotional), the notes and drawings they make for me, their precious hearts when they try to help me or that they've learned how to use the Keurig to bring me coffee in the morning...I could go on and on.

Now, here's the part where we get honest with ourselves.  Yes, we love our kids and we love our family (or, hopefully, most of the time), but we are not perfect.  Nor should we be perfect.  As we analyze ourselves and our families, we hav…

Cybersecurity 101

One of the things that continually amazes me as a parent of young(er) children is their ability to quickly understand technology and its uses.  Not only have my children learned the art of swiping to use different devices, but they've also learned how to access apps, take pictures, answer calls (both phone and Skype), and more.  My children could teach their grandparents a lesson or two on how to use technology.

But, as a student of cybersecurity, I have seen a greater need to educate my children - as well as so many others - on the cybersecurity.  This goes beyond posting inappropriate pictures and unfriendly words on social media (although these lessons must also be taught).  This goes into the nature of understanding the benefits and risks of using technology and the privacy lost to it.  The major premise that must be understood in regards to cybersecurity is that information/data is money.  It's value is continually increasing.  We need to secure our information just as we…