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Getting ink off your TV or computer monitor

Our home office is typically off limits to our children.  Because of this, it is the area in which they both desire - more than anything - to spend their time.  We've set up gates, filing cabinets, trash cans, and storage bins in the entrance to our office (it's an open den area) in an effort to foil their attempts to enter.  They have all failed.

Upon gaining entrance to this heavily guarded fortress within our home, our children's (especially our 2-year-old son's) mission quickly changes to 'seek and destroy'.  What do they seek?  Primarily our computer monitors because aren't they just one giant screen on which a child is meant to color?

So, if you come across this same battle with your children, be sure to keep a bottle of Isopropyl Alcohol on hand.  Use either a Q-tip or cotton ball (be sure your monitor is off) and gently rub across the screen.  In a matter of seconds, the drawings are erased.  This is effective for Sharpie, highlighter, dry erase markers and ball point pen.

Now, your monitors are once again ready to battle another day.

...As a side note, all of this battling that goes on in my house makes me wonder why toddlers are not chosen for employment in demolition.  If there's a company wishing to destroy something beyond repair, feel free to contact me...I have your greatest solution.

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