Skip to main content

Sleep - is it just a fairy tale?

Once upon a time, in a land far away, there were families with children who slept - and allowed their parents to sleep... 

It seems like sleep is simply a fairy tale.  Once upon a time, I slept.  Or, if I didn't sleep, it was a conscious choice on my part.  A late night study session or cramming to get a paper written.  Talking with good friends until the wee hours of the morning.  Or, watching the marathon session of a BBC miniseries. 

Nowadays, I think that sleep has become this fairy tale of hope.  I daydream about it, but never actually reach it.  I lay down at night thinking, "Tonight could be the night!" But, then my child needs to go to the potty one more - or fifty more - times (obviously important).  Or, they need one more hug and kiss (who can deny these?).  How about one more book? (Ok, this one is easy to say "no" to).  They've lost their favorite toy, blanket, snuggle item.  They continue to tell you that they're not tired, despite the ever-present yawning and head nodding - or tantrums which, just as with a wind up toy, seem to spin up right before they're completely and utterly exhausted.  My children even attempt to prove to me that they are sleeping through telling me that they are sleeping.  They forget: I wasn't born yesterday.

"Mommy, go away! I'm sleeping."  ...Sure, I believe that.

I sometimes believe that I have actually fallen asleep.  I'm not sure that I can prove that it's happened.  It feels like it might have because I'm suddenly stunned awake by a deafening scream announcing a monster under my child's bed or the fact that it's dance time (despite the fact that it's 3am).  Or, perhaps, I'm awoken by the dreaded sick child - something that pulls on the heartstrings of every parent.

I've had moments where I've brought my child into my bed simply for the hope that they will fall asleep there.  And, most of the time, they will - after finding the most optimal way for their tiny body to occupy a majority of the bed.



Sleep is important for both parent and child.  But, as Murphy's Laws for Moms continually prove, when a parent most wants and/or needs sleep, the child/children will find any and every excuse (often going down the complete list of excuses) to stay awake - no matter how tired they actually are.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Here's a Friday First for me, a video!  Let me know what you think about it and if you'd like to see more.  Also, share what your plans are for the weekend to help others figure out what they're going to do.

Leadership Mom: SWOT Analysis

In business, leaders often analyze our Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats through a SWOT analysis.  So, if we are going to look at our role as moms as being the greatest leadership opportunity to us, let's start with analyzing ourselves and our kids.  Here's the SWOT I developed for my family:

As a doting mother, there are hundreds of strengths that I could put up here for my kids.  Their hugs, kisses, bedtime stories and prayers, the fact that they come to me when they're seeking healing from an injury (physical or emotional), the notes and drawings they make for me, their precious hearts when they try to help me or that they've learned how to use the Keurig to bring me coffee in the morning...I could go on and on.

Now, here's the part where we get honest with ourselves.  Yes, we love our kids and we love our family (or, hopefully, most of the time), but we are not perfect.  Nor should we be perfect.  As we analyze ourselves and our families, we hav…

Thoughts from a non-traditional student

It's the end of the school year for many of us.  My kids are thrilled about this and keep telling me that they're so excited to have the summer off...they don't yet realize that we'll have a new family chore chart and lessons on being a "contributor" to the family!

For me, the end of the school year is also exciting.  It is also the end of my first year back to school for a new degree in Cyber Operations, a degree that is almost the complete opposite of my other degree in Communication and Advertising.  It also was exciting to realize that you really can start learning something new at any age, no matter how long it's been since your last time in school.  With this in mind, I thought I'd do a recap of some thoughts I had during my nontraditional year.
Going back to school is scary.  There's new technology. Not every teacher uses a textbook. You're *often* older than the teachers. There's no easy way to balance school-work-family life. You&#…